Hoogsteder Journal No. 04

Golden Age Painters in The Hague

All Painters Active in The Hague Between 1600 – 1700 A new Hoogsteder publication – Golden Age Painters in The Hague – will be appearing in October 1998. This standard work contains discussions on all the circa 600 painters who lived and worked in The Hague in the seventeenth century. Accompanying the book is an exhibition at the Hague Historical Museum, running from mid-December 1998 to early March 1999.

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The Rise and Fall of Prices

In the first issue of the Hoogsteder Journal we announced our intention to keep you informed on the subject of values of Old Master Paintings. In fact, there’s nothing new about this – 250 years ago a colleague of ours was doing exactly the same thing. In 1752 art dealer Gerard Hoet gathered an enormous collection of auction catalogues with prices into two substantial volumes. Taking his Catalogus of Naamlyst van Schilderyen, met derselver Pryzen, we have looked at what some of the paintings from our own Spring exhibition were worth in Hoet’s day. This research also enabled us to form a general picture of the influences affecting prices of Old Masters in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

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Anna Ruysch’s Rabbit’s teeth and Fringes

Most seventeenth-century artists did not sign their paintings. Today, however, the public wants to know who the artist was. One way of finding out is by comparing styles. Only after years of intensive study do different artists’ styles become recognisable. But sometimes the variations between painters are so subtle that it takes an expert to identify them.

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Images of Warfare in Delft

In a recent television survey, ordinary Dutch people were asked what they thought of the national anthem. William of Nassau they knew, but why the homage to the King of Spain was a mystery. Perhaps the Images of Warfare exhibition at Delft’s Prinsenhof (site of the assassination of the Prince of Orange in 1584) will refresh a few memories.

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Work in Progress

When admiring the beauty of an Old Master, it is often difficult to see how the painting was actually made. All the artist’s preparatory work is hidden behind the confident brush strokes. However, modern methods sometimes make it possible to look behind the scenes.

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